Sometimes, Forever by Soccer Mommy

Sometimes, Forever
Released: 24th June, 2022

About Sometimes, Forever

Sometimes, Forever is an album by Soccer Mommy. The album was released on Jun 24, 2022. It contains 11 songs.

Tracklist


Critic Reviews

  • Expertly navigating an ocean of stylistic and lyrical juxtapositions, Soccer Mommy’s third album serves as a modern mercurial masterpiece.

    Rating: 100/100
    The Skinny
  • It cements Soccer Mommy as one of the most exciting voices in indie pop, and it’s a record I’ll be coming back to all summer long.

    Rating: 100/100
    Albumism
  • Sometimes, Forever is a rich and varied album, with ultramodern production that never tramples the influences at play.

    Rating: 90/100
    Exclaim!
  • Though Allison never fully finds closure on Sometimes, Forever – or at least not for very long – its very existence is a testament to its creator’s continued survival, and the music contained within is a reminder that even in their darkest moments, the listener is never alone – and need never be without hope.

    Rating: 90/100
    The Line of Best Fit
  • The Nashville indie-rock group’s Oneohtrix Point Never-produced third album is their most creative work to date, and sacrifices none of their signature sound.

    Rating: 85/100
    Paste
  • It’s a record that operates in extremes, with the highs ascending to ultra-catchy pop bliss and the lows exploring barren depths of depression. Each emotion and each moment is transient, leading seamlessly into the next in an overwhelming rush.

    Rating: 85/100
    Under The Radar
  • Sophie Allison's ascent from teenage bedroom-pop savant to incisive chronicler of Gen Z angst hits a crescendo on Sometimes, Forever, an improbable but rewarding collaboration with Oneohtrix Point Never's Daniel Lopatin.

    Rating: 80/100
    Uncut
  • She veers from one sonic pole to another in thrilling fashion.

    Rating: 80/100
    DIY
  • On this album though, we see Allison collaborating to add extra layers of depth and artistry to her already deeply artistic songwriting and it’s extremely rewarding.

    Rating: 80/100
    Northern Transmissions
  • The title itself alludes to the cyclic nature of life, and that applies to art too: ‘Sometimes, Forever’ is a versatile exploration of opposing states, so don’t go into this delightfully diverse journey expecting an easy ride.

    Rating: 80/100
    Dork
  • On this third album, Sophie Allison combines intensely confessional lyrics with her pop-minded melodies to break free from the tags ascribed to her.

    Rating: 80/100
    NME
  • Sophie Allison’s impressive follow-up to Color Theory sets emotional gridlock, the supernatural and apocalyptic despair to sweet melody and cold gusts of noise.

    Rating: 80/100
    The Guardian
  • From the way she embellishes tracks with tambourines and electronic flourishes, ‘Sometimes, Forever’ is a marker of a completely new era.

    Rating: 80/100
    Clash
  • For the most part, the album is all the better for its wide scope and experimental approach, providing fertile ground for some of Allison’s most heartfelt songwriting to date. Daringly vulnerable and vocally impeccable, she still has us hanging on every word.

    Rating: 80/100
    Gigwise
  • Where color theory dipped its toes into sombre and sacrilegious imagery, Sometimes, Forever dives in headfirst. Motifs of blood, bones, fire and demons sneak into nearly every track.

    Rating: 80/100
    Crack Magazine
  • Although it’s easy to reel off the comparisons and potential references on Sometimes, Forever, Soccer Mommy has undoubtedly found a voice which is very much her own, and is only getting more accomplished with it.

    Rating: 70/100
    Loud and Quiet
  • When aesthetic balances are in place for much of Sometimes, Forever, Soccer Mommy glows like a moon reflecting a dying sun, one of the substantial artists of her generation.

    Rating: 70/100
    PopMatters
  • Though Sometimes, Forever is more sonically diverse and lyrically cohesive than Soccer Mommy’s previous albums, its lyrical themes and melodies aren’t nearly as indelible.

    Rating: 60/100
    Slant Magazine